Incendiary Heart

It takes guts to be gentle and kind.
Gregory Alan Isakov

—Honey, It's Alright

Honey It’s Alright - Gregory Alan Isakov
Honey, it’s alright to be alone
Honey, it’s alright to be
Amongst the rubble and stone

(via ohmygodwhatever-etc)

It was a blockbuster summer.

It was a blockbuster summer.

Butch Walker

—ATL

Oh Atlanta, please need me like I needed you
Let your sweaty embrace open wide
‘Cause Atlanta, I’m falling like some people do
And I need all your ground to survive
‘Cause Atlanta, I’m suffocating like some people do
And I need all your air to survive

Butch Walker
“ATL”

(Source: mausspacearchive)

Oh, #atlanta… (at Beltline Mile 9.25)

Oh, #atlanta… (at Beltline Mile 9.25)

When my husband [Carl Sagan] died, because he was so famous and known for not being a believer, many people would come up to me — it still sometimes happens — and ask me if Carl changed at the end and converted to a belief in an afterlife. They also frequently ask me if I think I will see him again.

Carl faced his death with unflagging courage and never sought refuge in illusions. The tragedy was that we knew we would never see each other again. I don’t ever expect to be reunited with Carl. But, the great thing is that when we were together, for nearly twenty years, we lived with a vivid appreciation of how brief and precious life is. We never trivialized the meaning of death by pretending it was anything other than a final parting. Every single moment that we were alive and we were together was miraculous — not miraculous in the sense of inexplicable or supernatural. We knew we were beneficiaries of chance… That pure chance could be so generous and so kind… That we could find each other, as Carl wrote so beautifully in Cosmos, you know, in the vastness of space and the immensity of time… That we could be together for twenty years. That is something which sustains me and it’s much more meaningful.

The way he treated me and the way I treated him, the way we took care of each other and our family, while he lived. That is so much more important than the idea I will see him someday. I don’t think I’ll ever see Carl again. But I saw him. We saw each other. We found each other in the cosmos, and that was wonderful.

Ann Druyan (via whats-out-there)

(via findingoregoninfootsteps)

butchwalker:

Goodnight. Sleep tight. Don’t let the bad vibes bite.

butchwalker:

Goodnight. Sleep tight. Don’t let the bad vibes bite.

I actually attack the concept of happiness. The idea that - I don’t mind people being happy - but the idea that everything we do is part of the pursuit of happiness seems to me a really dangerous idea and has led to a contemporary disease in Western society, which is fear of sadness. It’s a really odd thing that we’re now seeing people saying “write down 3 things that made you happy today before you go to sleep”, and “cheer up” and “happiness is our birthright” and so on. We’re kind of teaching our kids that happiness is the default position - it’s rubbish. Wholeness is what we ought to be striving for and part of that is sadness, disappointment, frustration, failure; all of those things which make us who we are. Happiness and victory and fulfillment are nice little things that also happen to us, but they don’t teach us much. Everyone says we grow through pain and then as soon as they experience pain they say “Quick! Move on! Cheer up!” I’d like just for a year to have a moratorium on the word “happiness” and to replace it with the word “wholeness”. Ask yourself “is this contributing to my wholeness?” and if you’re having a bad day, it is.

Hugh Mackay

- wow, I’ve never thought of it like this.

(via feelicity)

(Source: seabois, via feelicity)